Photonic Fence Concept

This illustration shows one way our “photonic fence” mosquito laser system could be used to set up a perimeter defense, protecting a single building. The red “fence” shows a border that mosquitoes can’t pass through, but it is safe for everything else. There is no top coverage because mosquitoes don’t fly very high.

Photonic Fence Concept Rendering

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5 Comments

  1. Matthew Burns
    Posted June 23, 2009 at 2:50 pm | Permalink

    From the picture it looks like there’s an actual “wall” of light/protection.
    Is that the case, or does that just illustrate the range and boundaries of the laser zapper?

  2. Mike
    Posted June 26, 2009 at 11:33 pm | Permalink

    I didn’t feel like putting my words into sentences, so here a bullet points:
    Cons:
    -lack of reliable power generation in remote locations at night, the time and places where protection is most needed
    -sensitivity of optics, electronics, and mechanics to dust, humidity, and wear, likely necessitating frequent maintenance or replacement
    -lack of facilities and expertise for maintenance in the areas most affected by malaria
    -numerous sensors and lasers would be required to provide complete coverage of even the small area shown in the illustration
    -a fence made of netting protected by chain link would be less expensive, easier to set up and maintain, and likely more effective.

    Pros:
    -It has lasers
    -It actually kills the mosquitoes
    -It provides no obstruction to things that aren’t mosquitoes

    With that last point in mind, the best use I can imagine for this sort of system is in a sort of mosquito “airlock,” since mosquitoes could enter with humans and this seems like a superior alternative to manual inspection or fumigation. Crucially, the confined space would remove all scaling problems and potentially allow the environment to be optimized for efficient detection (there are no flat, white surfaces for silhouettes to be cast upon in the wild). Even so, the problems of powering and maintaining the system would keep it out of reach for most people in malaria afflicted areas. It would probably only ever be used at hospitals, embassies, and mansions.

    @Matt: the red walls symbolize the boundaries of the mosquito-free zone, but the actual protection would be in the form of short, targeted laser pulses fired from the towers before the mosquitoes crossed the boundary.

  3. Posted August 23, 2009 at 4:14 am | Permalink

    Can anybody tell me who invented this and where i can find further information on this Photonic Fence???

    Thank you
    Benjamin

  4. Posted October 26, 2009 at 12:55 pm | Permalink

    For public areas in and out of buildings this is a great concept… more practical applications would be for homes and window screen installation to keep the mosquitoes directly out of home, mobile home, campers or camping ground and tents. Then again this is a passive application and doesn’t really wipe them out at the source before they are hatched. Within the application, other them killing them at the source imagine building fences like these around all the major water sources. The only question then becomes who’s going to pay for the energy needed to power these system? Maybe we can apply our new wind turbine to this idea as a self contained power source and set up portable “Dragonfly Mosquito De-Fence System”? (DMDS) – Ironically, the Dragonfly is the Mosquitoes biggest threat in nature…

    I really don’t know what Mosquitoes contribute to the environment but they still pose a threat to human life all over this planet! This Idea is a very interesting concept!

  5. Posted February 14, 2010 at 11:53 pm | Permalink

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